Tag Archives: Recipe

Drink of the Week: Morning Sex

Not sure what kind of “spam” messages I am likely to get posting this drink name, but it’s too darn delicious NOT to put on the site!

Morning SexMorning Sex

  •  2oz Bourbon
  • 3/4oz Lemon juice
  • 3/4oz Passion Fruit Puree
  • 1/2oz Masala Chai Syrup
  • 3 dash Peychauds Bitters

Shake and serve over a large ice cube.

Garnish: Orange twist or pansy flower

You can find this drink, among other greats, on the drink menu at The Wallace, Los Angeles- A fantastic new spot in the heart of Culver City. The food there is nothing short of exceptional (so much so, that I am coming out of my writing drought to discuss it!) and the drinks, although great already, will be getting a fresh spin in coming weeks from their new beverage director- Greg Bryson.

The drink listed above  is currently my favorite drink in Culver City.  From it’s memorable fun name to it’s accessible flavor profile, this drink has everything I could love in it.

The bourbon is subtle enough that any type of drinker can enjoy its flavor, no matter what their usual base alcohol preference is. It  has a delicious tropical sweetness coming from the fresh passionfruit juice, with no unnatural flavors to it (that tend to come from sweeter/fruity drinks.) It is refreshing, summery and makes me feel like i’m on vacation in Hawaii or the Caribbean when sipped on a hot day!

The presentation at The Wallace over a large ice cube also makes it an accessible ‘not too girly’ looking drink option for both men and women., which I think is very smart. In past few visits they have started to garnish it with a pansy (flower), which looks really pretty and a nice alternative to the orange peel.

I admit this recipe will be hard to reproduce at home, in particular the ‘chai syrup’ but it’s definitely worth heading in to The Wallace to try it on its home turf.  Whilst you’re there, try some of the food too…it’s all fantastic. I would write a review on the whole place right now, but I plan to go back for a 4th visit (in 2 weeks) to try even more food before I write about it. It’s just that good.

Delicious, Delicious, Delicious.

 

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Drink of the Week

Delicious drink "China Doll"

Delicious drink “China Doll”

China Doll

  • 1 1/2 oz Caprock Gin
  • 3/4 oz Lemon Juice
  • 1 oz Coconut Jasmine Cream
  • 5 drops Jasmine Rose Water
  • Egg White

Garnish: Edible Rose Petals

In December I celebrated Repeal day (for a reminder of what that is, click here!) and ended up at No Vacancy in Hollywood. First off, I adore the entrance to No Vacancy. I used to go there when it was ‘Jane’s House’ and the building itself is, well, a house!  The Houston Brothers totally utilized this look for No Vacancy by creating an elaborate entrance wherein you enter a bedroom and a lady tells you the “house rules”, then the bed splits in half and you walk under it and end up in the main house staircase. Very cool and different.  I recommend checking it out when you’re next out in Hollywood.

Anyway, I digress. At the Repeal Day event I tried the above cocktail and it was nothing short of delicious! The original drink recipe was created by Sean Hamilton (Bar Manager of No Vacancy) and I had it made for me on this occasion by bartender Jimmy Avelar. I loved it!

It was beautifully balanced, sweet and creamy but with a delicate feminine quality from the jasmine.  From my first sip I knew it had to be a ‘Drink of the week’ on here and because of it’s ‘lady like’ qualities, I plan on serving it at my bridal shower!  Clearly it is a recipe not so easy to replicate at home, what with the jasmine infusions, but if you decide to give it a go, I don’t think you will be disappointed. 🙂

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The Fussy Bride

Yeah yeah, I know….I haven’t written in a really long time!

Life may have been getting in the way of my blogging, but that doesn’t mean I haven’t been out and about eating and drinking to my hearts content. Trust me, I definitely have!  There will be posts coming shortly on these places, but bare with me in the next few months.

For those fussy readers who don’t know me personally, I should let you know that I recently got engaged (YAY!) to my Beverage Director fiance who is usually mentioned on here as FutureGreg.

Wedding planning is extremely time consuming, but I am having the most incredible fun with it all.  To keep my readers in the loop, I thought it would be nice to put up the two Punch recipes that we provided at our recent Engagement party.  They were such a success, we intend on having them again at the wedding itself. Greg came up with both recipes, although I take credit for their wonderful names. 🙂

Image from stylemewhimsy.com

Image from stylemewhimsy.com

The Drunken Bride

  • 750ml No.3 Gin
  • 300ml fresh lemon juice
  • 300ml simple syrup
  • 100ml strawberry juice
  • 100ml cucumber juice
  • 200ml soda water

Serve in a Punch bowl over large ice cube.

Serves approx 14. Double ingredients (like we did) to serve more, obviously!

This punch was a HUGE success at the party. It’s refreshing, fruity and delightful as a summer drink. Greg made this on the sweeter side for me, and was designed with the girls in mind. Beautifully balanced and reminded me of a Strawberry lemonade. Easy to drink and even easier to get tipsy on!

Oaxocan Down the Aisle

  • 750ml Yorkshire Tea infused Mezcal Ilegal    (20 minute cold brew with 4 tea bags)
  • 300ml lemon juice
  • 300ml runny honey (2parts colver honey: 1 part filtered water)

Served over large ice cube. Serves 14

For those who don’t understand the humor in this name, Oaxacan is pronounced (wa-ha-ken) and is the name of the people from Oaxaca, Mexico.  It was created to pair my ‘British side’ (the English Tea infusion) with Greg’s Mexican side (Mezcal). 

Yorkshire Tea Bags +ilegal_mezcal_joven

This Punch was deliciously smoky with an interesting twist from the yorkshire tea, that I felt gave an almost creamy element to the drink and softened the Mezcal. I originally didn’t think the flavor pairings would work when FutureGreg suggested it, but it came out perfectly. Really delicious and original flavors.

Anyway, that’s all for now! Here is a photo of us at our Engagement party with delicious Sprinkles cupcakes.

Sprinkles

Enjoy!

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Drink of the Week

Egg Nog Egg Nog and cookies

  • 4 cups milk
  • 1 1/3 cups sugar
  • 12 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup bourbon
  • 1 cup chilled heavy cream

Garnish: Grated nutmeg

Directions

  1. In a saucepan, whisk the milk and sugar together over a medium heat until sugar is dissolved. In a large bowl, whisk eggs. Whilst continuing to whisk pour your hot milk/sugar mixture into the eggs in a slow and steady stream.
  2. Return mixture to pan; cook over medium-low heat, stirring often, until thick enough to coat the back of a spoon, (this usually takes about 20 to 25 minutes but do not let it simmer.) Quickly strain into a bowl. Stir in bourbon and cream. Let the drink cool completely then refrigerate until chilled.

Ok ok, I know i’m a little late for a Christmas drink…but to be fair I was off enjoying the holidays these past weeks and didn’t have time to write this great old recipe up! Seeing as it’s  currently winter this classic is still a great option to make, especially if you plan on a late holiday party or simply want a creamy delicious drink to create at home! The above recipe will serve 6 people and is a recipe I found on the Martha Steward website.  I chose this version because it is pretty traditional in character and very easy to execute, it is also extremely tasty.

Sherry Egg NogKappler Eggnog

  • 2oz Sherry
  • 1 Whole egg
  • 1/2 tbsp sugar

Shake thoroughly and serve in tall glass, garnish with Nutmeg.

This recipe was created by George Kappler and documented in 1895.  It was a popular version at the time, however nowadays people tend to want the heated version above it because they don’t like the idea of having a whole raw egg in their drink.  Using a whole egg in a drink is often referred to as a flip and provided the eggs are fresh these drinks are perfectly safe to have.  Some of my favorite drinks out there include raw egg (Clover Club, Whiskey Sours), because they give a creamy texture to any drink they are in.

Egg Nog is known across the World as a Christmas drink, and there are literally hundreds of variations/recipes to choose from.  The recipes may contain whiskey, rum, brandy, bourbon, or cognac. Some will contain multiple spirits in the drink.

The origins of the Egg Nog are unclear however many suggest it dates back hundreds of years to Medieval Europe with suggestion that it originated in East Anglia, England as an ‘Egg Flip’ (named after the technique of ‘flipping’ the egg back and forth when mixing.)  Some believe however it is a variation developed later on from the Posset, a British hot drink in the 19th Century that involved heating milk with ale until it curdled and adding spices.

Whatever the origins, the end result is very interesting and surprisingly ‘NOT’ eggy in taste. It is a strong, creamy and tasty drink that’s almost like a custard in consistency. The nutmeg on the nose makes it very appropriate for the holiday season and a good option for Christmas parties.

Anyway, I hope everyone enjoyed some great New Year celebrations this week. There will be lots of new restaurant openings, drink creations and mixology events again this year, so be sure to keep checking in for all your “Fussy One” 2013 reviews and posts!

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!!

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A “British” contribution to Thanksgiving Dinner!

Today my post will be a Fussy One first… I am going to give you a FOOD recipe! As everyone in the United States should be aware, yesterday was Thanksgiving.  This means there was probably a lot of drinking and even more eating across the country. As most of my readers know, I myself am not from the US, however I have been living here in Los Angeles for 5 years in January (is it already that long??!!) and have plenty to be thankful for.

I live with my Beverage Consultant boyfriend, (known on this blog as FutureGreg or FG) and his wonderful family.  Every year on thanksgiving we have a big sit down dinner with extended family and friends, and although FGs Dad does the majority of the cooking, most of the guests bring a dish as part of the meal.  For the past few years I have been contributing the following dish and it’s proved so successful I thought I would document it for the blog this time.  So here you go, the first cooking recipe on the fussy one…

STEAK AND GUINNESS PIE

This recipe is a variation of one originally created by British Chef Jamie Oliver.  I admit, it does take a little while to make this one (a good 2.5 hrs in the oven stewing the ingredients) but it is well worth the effort because the pie itself is delicious.  Jamie calls for mushrooms in his recipe, but considering I can’t stand the texture of mushrooms when they’re hidden in food I have chosen not to include them.

Ingredients (Serves 4-6)

  • 2.2 lb.. (1kg) Brisket of Beef
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and Pepper
  • 30g of Butter
  • 2 Sprigs of Rosemary (leaves picked and chopped)
  • 2 Sticks Celery
  • 2 Carrots
  • 3 Medium Red Onions
  • 3 Cloves Garlic
  • 1 can of Guinness (440ml)
  • 2 Heaped tbsp of Flour
  • 200g Grated Cheddar Cheese
  • 1 large Organic Egg (beaten)
  • Pastry Sheets (pre rolled) or 500g ready-made all-butter puff pastry

Making the filling

  1. Ok, first off lay out all your ingredients and equipment to check you have everything you need. I don’t cook often so when I do I get pretty frustrated when I realize half way through I don’t have the correct pan or am missing a vital herb!! This recipe calls for a pan that can transfer from the stove top to the oven, so double check you can do that. I have had issues before when I realized the pan i’m using will not last in the oven.
  2. Pre-heat your oven  375ºF/190ºC/gas 5.
  3. Next start chopping the ingredients.  Bare in mind that 3 medium red onions looks like a lot when chopped up and I always worry it’s too much, but it reduces completely in the stew so don’t be put off by how much there is.  I personally think it’s a good idea to finely chop the celery and carrots (mainly because I hate the texture of ‘bits’ in my food) but you can chop them larger if you prefer.
  4. Cut the meat in to 1 inch thick cubes.
  5. Pour a ‘glug’ of olive oil in to the pan. A glug is the ‘technical term’ Jamie Oliver gives, I take it to be about a tablespoon or so…just to get the onions frying without burning. Add the onions and on a low heat start to reduce them, stir for about 10 mins.
  6. Add the garlic, butter, celery and carrots once the onions start to go clear (but don’t let them burn).
  7. Mix everything together before adding the rosemary and then the chopped beef. Season with a pinch of salt and a teaspoon of black pepper. (You will season more later.)
  8. Fry fast for 3 to 4 minutes then pour in the Guinness, the flour and just enough water to cover all the meat. Bring to a simmer, cover the pan then place in the preheated Oven for 1 1/2hours.
  9. After an hour and a half take the stew out the oven, give it a stir and place it back in for another hour. The house will start to smell so yummy by this point, but don’t be deceived…still a long way to go!!!
  10. When the time is up and you take it out, the meat should be tender and the stew  should be rich, dark and thick.  If there still seems to be a lot of liquid (almost always is with mine) then reduce it on the stove for a little longer. A good filling needs to be robust. At this point stir in half the grated cheese too. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

If you want to stop at this point you can cool the mixture and place in the fridge over night until you’re ready to fill the pie. I always make my mixture the night before, then cook it in to the pie an hour before I plan to serve it the next day.

Filling the pie

  1. The next stage varies from person to person. The original recipe calls for “Puff Pastry” but I have established that most Americans don’t know what this is and certainly don’t sell it pre-made in Los Angeles.  You can choose to make your own puff pastry or buy a pre-rolled regular  pastry.  Puff Pastry, for those that don’t know, is a deliciously flaky pastry used in pies in England. It is buttery and divine, but don’t be disheartened if you struggle to find a recipe because regular pastry works fine too…it’s the filling that makes this pie in my opinion!
  2. Roll out your pastry (if needs be) to make sure it will fit a deep dish pan.
  3. Line a deep dish pan with the first sheet of pastry and make sure the edges are dangling over the sides so you can fold them together at the end.
  4. Pour or spoon the mixture in to the lined pan and even it out.
  5. Sprinkle the rest of the grated cheddar on top.
  6. Roll the second sheet of pastry over the top. I like to twist the overlapping pastry together to make it look pretty, but you can simply crush it with a fork and cut off the excess if you like.  Poke some holes in the top and brush with a little beaten egg.
  7. Place the whole pie in the oven on the bottom shelf for 45 minutes at 375ºF/190ºC/gas 5.  
  8. When the top is golden, take it out and serve. DELICIOUS!!!

I hope you like this recipe, it’s very British to have a pie on a cold day and although it never gets THAT cold here in LA, it still is a great dish to make once in a while.  If it’s not a holiday you can serve it simply with mash potatoes and peas, always goes down a treat. 🙂

Thanksgiving is a day when we get to say what we’re thankful for, and so I want to say “I am thankful for my American family.”  My loving boyfriend and his wonderful parents have always made me feel so welcome in their home and I appreciate them so much…his brother and grandparents, Aunties and cousins have done the same and made me feel part of the family every year.  I am also thankful to my parents in England, and this British pie is a representation of them too.

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!!

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Drink of the Week

Acero

  • 2oz Rye
  • 3/4oz Lemon juice
  • 3/4oz Maple Syrup (Organic Grade B)
  • 1 Egg white

Garnish: Bacon piece

This drink was created by Greg Bryson for the new Fall menu that just rolled out at Hostaria Del Piccolo in Santa Monica (it will also be featured at their new location in Venice, which opens next month). The recipe was inspired by a drink called the Woodstock, which uses Gin as the base, orange bitters, Maple and Lemon juice.  I couldn’t find ANY notable history on The Woodstock i’m afraid, however the history of the Acero is simple. Greg wanted a drink using Maple Syrup for his Fall menu and after several variations found the above combination of ingredients to be the best! Hostaria Del Piccolo is an Italian Restaurant, therefore they named the drink ‘Acero’ which means ‘Maple’ in Italian.

I love this drink because it’s deliciously sweet, has a creamy texture from the egg white and the lemon balances with the Rye and Maple flavors perfectly.  The bacon garnish tastes great too, and the sweet salty pairing is a great combo.  It basically has a Whiskey Sour taste to it, only more autumnal because of the maple syrup.

I am told it does make a difference with the kind of maple syrup you use, Greg specifies to use Organic Grade B because other grades can end up being too sweet and throw the balance off.

Have a go making this at home (a great option for Thanksgiving dinner) or if you’re in Los Angeles, make a point to head over to Hostaria Del Piccolo in the coming months to try this and other great new drinks off of their menu.

ENJOY!

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Drink of the Week

Jack Rose

  • 2oz AppleJack Brandy
  • 3/4oz Fresh Lime juice (or Lemon juice)
  • 3/4oz Real Grenadine

Garnish: Lime or Lemon (depending on juice chosen)

Please Note: The photo above has been borrowed from YMN, and was not taken by myself.  It was the best looking image of the Jack Rose I could find.

This is such a simple drink to make at home, and such a great option for Fall.  I have been thinking about Autumnal drinks all week, and will be posting several more as my favorite bartenders roll out their fall cocktail menus.  The Jack Rose is a classic from the 1920s, we know it dates back at least this far because in Ernest Hemingway‘s 1926 classic, The Sun Also Rises, the narrator Jake drinks a Jack Rose in the Crillon Paris hotel bar.

As with many of the drinks I learn about, this too has many theories and stories of it’s origin. There are a slew of ideas that relate to it’s name, some say it is named after Gambler Bald Jack Rose, others suggested that the name was invented by Joseph P. Rose, a  New Jersey restaurateur with the nickname Jack, who once held the title of “World’s Champion Mixologist.”

There are other theories, although Wikipedia (of all places) suggests the most likely explanation of the name is the fact that it is made with applejack and is rose colored from the grenadine. This makes the most sense to me, maybe there is no dramatic reason for it’s name at all…perhaps people get so caught up in the stories they can’t see the wood for the trees!

My boyfriend just informed me that there is also a genre of drink called the ‘Rose’ which is simply a Sour with grenadine, there is a Tequila Rose, A Rye rose etc. and this drink is a an Applejack rose! The same still applies though, the drink is rose colored from the grenadine.

This is a very tasty drink with apple notes that come through from the apple brandy. I suggest using Lairds Bonded Applejack if you can get it, it works the best for me and under no circumstances use a fake grenadine like Rose’s, it will ruin the flavor profile. Take the time to make your own grenadine (pomegranate juice to equal parts sugar and a dash orange blossom water) you won’t regret it!

The Jack Rose itself is a benchmark brandy drink because of how well it pairs with the citrus and grenadine.  There is some debate as to whether it is supposed to be with lemon or lime juice, I personally prefer it with lemon but my boyfriend says lime juice works better. To each his own!

The drink is mildly sweet, strong and perfect for the Fall season we’re now in. Give it a go!

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