Tag Archives: drink of the week

Drink of the Week

Irish Coffee (Caifé Gaelach in Irish)Irish-Coffee

  • 2oz Irish Whiskey
  • 3/4oz Brown Sugar
  • 4oz Hot Black Coffee
  • 2oz Fresh thick cream

Serve in an 10 oz Glass Coffee Mug/Toddy glass

This may not be the most original drink recipe to post, but is certainly one of my favorites at this time of year.  When my boyfriend (FG) and I went to Ireland 2 years ago we had several of these delicious beverages and couldn’t believe how much better they were than the ones we’d ever had in the States.  The secret, we discovered, is in two major components of the drink. There is NO baileys in a true Irish Coffee and the cream topping is NOT whipped cream. This is a terrible misconception, for some reason everywhere I go in LA offers whip cream on top and Baileys Irish cream inside.

Thick cream is what you should actually use, and although to some extent it is slightly whipped with a fork, it is still very much a liquid. If you can dollop the cream on top you have whipped too much.

Pour the hot coffee into an Irish coffee mug then add the Whiskey and sugar, stir until fully dissolved. The sugar is essential for floating liquid cream on top. The cream is carefully poured over the back of a spoon initially held just above the surface of the coffee and gradually raised a little. The layer of cream will float on the coffee without mixing with it and looks amazing. You should then drink the coffee through the cool layer of cream.

Although different variations of coffee cocktails pre-date the now-classic Irish coffee by at least 100 years, the original Irish coffee is said to have been invented by Joe Sheridan, a chef at Foynes Port in the county of Limerick, in West Ireland.  Passengers arriving to Foynes were often tired, freezing and in a bad mood. One evening in the winter of 1942, a Pan Am plane took off from Foynes but had to turn back due to severe weather. The passengers on board were apparently terribly upset and tired after returning to the airbase, and Joe wanted to prepare something special for them and warm them up. He created the Irish coffee recipe on a whim and when the American travelers were immediately hooked, and when one guest asked, “Is this Brazilian coffee?” Joe responded with: “No, That’s Irish Coffee.”

Kind of a cool story (if it’s true, which i’m not able to verify) but even if it isn’t true, this is a great drink to heat you up on a cold winters day. Enjoy!

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Drink of the Week

Drink of the Week

Hot Whiskey Toddyzacapa-hot-toddy-290x290

  • 2oz Bourbon
  • 1/2oz Lemon
  • 3/4oz Honey
  • Boiling hot water
  • 3 Cloves

Garnish: Lemon Wedge

You must put in the spirits before the hot water, then stir with a spoon. Use a Toddy glass if you have one.

It is officially flu season, and sadly today I am writing this post from the comfort of my bed with a horrible sore throat and a stuffy nose! HOWEVER a silver lining can be found in the above drink which is great when you’re feeling a little under the weather.

Honey and lemon are very soothing for a sore throat, and the alcohol will kill some of those germs…even if I just made all that up, the drink tastes great and you will at least feel better from drinking it!

The original recipe of a toddy calls for Brandy as the base, however Bourbon has become a popular alternative and American standard for the recipe. It is a really old drink so the origins are complicated and a little unclear, however Jerry Thomas writes about the Brandy Toddy and Whiskey Toddy in his book “How to mix drinks or the Bon-Vivant’s companion”  1862.

The Brandy Toddy being the one described with hot water, the Whiskey toddy says to use ice. I personally like using Whiskey in a hot toddy, although it is unclear why Jerry Thomas favored Brandy as the base for the hot version.  A Whiskey toddy is mentioned in Charles Dickens first book ‘The pickwick papers” which was written in 1867, so we know the late 1800s saw it as a fairly popular drink for cold nights.

Just so you know, a Toddy glass is a heat resistant glass mug that is perfect for Irish coffees as well as Toddy’s.  It is always a good idea to warm the glass before pouring in the boiling liquid, to prevent any risk of cracking.   If you don’t have a toddy mug in your collection, I recommend getting one because they are always useful to have around for hot drinks.

Leave a comment

Filed under Drink of the Week

Drink of the Week

Melabu

  • 2oz AppleJack
  • 3/4oz Apple Verbena Syrup
  • 3/4oz Fresh lime juice
  • 1 bar spoon Ground Cinnamon

Garnish: Lime wheel skewered with ground cinnamon.

This is another great drink inspired by Fall flavors. It is basically a ‘Jack Rose‘ with the addition of cinnamon.  I have to admit I’m not the biggest fan of cinnamon, but once in a while it really works in a drink and this recipe is a perfect example of such.  Apple and cinnamon are a great pairing, especially for an Autumnal feeling.

For those who don’t know, Applejack is one of Americas oldest alcoholic spirits and is completely produced from apples. It was historically made by concentrating hard cider using the traditional method of freeze distillation. The term applejack actually derives from the word jacking, a term for freeze distillation.  The product sold in stores today is no longer produced using this traditional process, however they maintain the product created is almost identical to the applejack available in colonial times.

The Melabu is another option from the ‘Autumn menu’ at Hostaria Del Piccolo in Santa Monica and was created by their beverage director Greg Bryson. It is a drink that is slightly sweet but not over the top, I think it will appeal to a lot of people in these colder months.

Leave a comment

Filed under Drink of the Week

Drink of the Week

The Brown Turkey

  • 1oz Aged Rum
  • 1oz Fig and Brown sugar reduction
  • 3 dashes Orange Bitters

Shake in ice and strain in to a flute

  • Top with 2oz Sparkling Wine

Garnish: Orange Twist

Fig and Brown Sugar Reduction:

In a pan on medium heat, dissolve 1 cup of brown sugar in 1 cup of water. Add 1/2 Cup of chopped fresh figs (or substitute dried figs if no fresh available) and bring to a boil.  Cover and remove from heat, let steep for 25 minutes. Fine strain into a glass bottle and keep refrigerated for up to 2 weeks.

* * * * *

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, I thought this sounded like a fun and somewhat different kind of drink option for the holiday.  I found this recipe in this months ‘Special Holiday issue’ of Imbibe Magazine and think it sounds really quite yummy.

Imbibe Holiday issue Nov/Dec 2012

I have to say, this is the first time I am putting up a drink as ‘drink of the week’ that I have actually not yet tasted!

It’s an intriguing recipe that sounds like it would be quite tasty though. I love figs and find them to have such a delicious natural sweetness that I believe would pair beautifully with aged rum.

The drink itself was created by Justin L Chamberlin of ‘Sagra Trattoria and Bar’ in Austin, Texas and is described in the magazine as being;

‘A formula that combines subtle spices of aged rum with the sultry sweetness of figs and a pop of sparking wine’.

I’m curious to see if the addition of bitters comes through strongly or not though.

I do intend on having my boyfriend create it next week to go with our thanksgiving feast, and I will be sure to report back on how it turns out. For now here is the recipe for all my Fussy readers who may wish to attempt it themselves, feel free to get in touch if you do make it and let me know how it goes.

Enjoy!

Leave a comment

Filed under Drink of the Week

I VOTE for… Tasty drinks!

Tomorrow (6th November 2012) is a big day in the USA, it is the day the American people will cast their vote for either Democrat President Obama or Republican Mitt Romney. I certainly know who i’d be voting for but I won’t say it here as it’s pretty irrelevant since I am not a citizen and therefore can’t vote anyway!

I thought i’d put a few election inspired drinks up though…you know how I love a good theme. 😀

In the BLUE corner…

There are very few ‘blue’ drinks I approve of, and no ‘Classic’ concoctions with a bright blue hue.  I had first planned to put up a drink with blueberries in but realize that using muddle blueberries creates more of a purple color. Sadly the only really blue drinks are ones that use a fake ingredient like ‘blueberry syrup’ or food coloring.  The drink I have chosen is the only drink I really like that has a bright blue color, and Paul Martins American Bistro (PMAB) is the only place i’ve seen a Lemon Drop made this way.

The PMAB Lemon Drop

  • 2oz Vodka (or Gin)
  • 3/4oz Lemon Juice
  • 3/4oz Simple Syrup
  • Splash of Blue Curacao

Garnish: Lemon Wheel and Sugar rim

I know it sounds terrible to the real drink connoisseurs  but I have to say it’s really tasty! Great if you have a sweet tooth (the sugar rim certainly does it for me!) and the pop of color makes it stand out. If you ever find yourself at a Paul Martins and want a sweet refreshing vodka drink, you should certainly give this one a go.

In the RED Corner…

There are plenty of Red options to choose from, but seeing as the drink name has ‘America’ in the title, this one seems appropriate!

Americano

  • 1oz Sweet Vermouth
  • 1oz Campari
  • 40z Soda

Garnish: Orange Peel/Slice

This drink dates back to the 1900s when it was first served in creator Gaspare Campari‘s bar, Caffè Campari, in 1860. It used to have a different name, (‘Milano-Torino’) but the drink creator supposedly changed it when it proved so popular with the American tourists.  It is actually a very interesting mix of flavors.  Using the beverage bitters (Campari) you get a gorgeous red color and the drink itself is a bitter sweet mix with a taste that makes you want to drink more.

Who will live in the White House?

On a recent trip to Washington DC we met and befriended legendary barman, writer, illustrator and fountain of knowledge; Derek Brown. The drink below was created by Derek (AKA The Presidents Mixologist) and is particularly fitting for my election theme because it has been served AT the White House itself. Derek probably thinks ‘The Presidents Mixologist’ is a bit of a pretentious title, and if you met him you’d know he would never want someone pushing for it but frankly that is what he is! He has been chosen to create drinks for the White House on more than one occasion, has interacted with President Obama personally and is pretty much the ‘King of Cocktails’ in Americas Capital City. To me he is certainly the Master when it comes to mixed drinks and also just an incredibly lovely man.

When thinking of drink recipes suitable for this Election week he was the first person I wanted to ask for input.  He wouldn’t reveal what the President drinks, pointing out that “pouring and telling in DC is a political no-no!”  He was, however, kind enough to give me the recipe for one of the drinks he prepared for the White House holiday parties back in 2009.

Robert Frost Cocktail

  • 3/4 oz. Bourbon
  • 3/4 oz. Dry Amontillado Sherry
  • 3/4 oz. White Port
  • 1/4 oz. Simple Syrup
  • 1 dash Orange Bitters

Combine ingredients with ice and shake until cold. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Garnish: Thinly sliced orange and lemon wheel.

Derek told me that ‘The Robert Frost Cocktail’ is based off the ‘Whispers’ or the ‘Frost Cocktail’. He says he also chose the name because Robert Frost is one of America’s top poets and a poet laureate who embraced progress while recognizing what made America great. Frost actually read at the inauguration of John F, Kennedy too. Derek told me; “Frost just seemed like the perfect inspiration to honor America’s new direction.”

This drink is DELICIOUS! I tried it for the first time today and think it’s just beautiful. Perfect for all kinds of drinker. The Port, Sherry and Bourbon make an incredibly delicious mix. It is balanced with both a strength and sweetness to it. If you can get the ingredients together, it’s certainly worth a shot making it at home.

So there you have it, 3 somewhat random drinks to sip on this week as you watch the polls go one way or the other.

!!!!DON’T FORGET TO VOTE ON TUESDAY!!!!

Leave a comment

Filed under Drink of the Week, Events

It’s SCARY!!!…how good these taste!

The pumpkin is carved, costume created and candy is placed in bowls ready for eager children’s hands…Yep, Halloween is upon us!

The time has come for me to put up some of my favorite ‘Halloween’ inspired mixed drinks, to get you in the mood…

Scary Classics

Corpse Reviver #2

  • 1oz Gin
  • 1oz Cocchi Americano
  • 3/4oz Cointreau
  • 3/4oz Lemon Juice
  • 1 Bar-spoon (1/2tsp) of Absinthe

Garnish: Maraschino Cherry

My first thought when I heard of this drink was ‘What about the Corpse reviver number one?!’ Apparently there are several drinks with the ‘Corpse Reviver’ name, but almost anyone who has tasted more than one would argue that this is the most palatable and balanced version.

The first publication of this drink can be seen in Harry Craddock’s The Savoy Cocktail Book’, 1930.  It is a drink that could supposedly raise any dead drinker on the morning after and was designed as a hangover cure (hence the name).

The original recipe calls for Quina Lillet, which is no longer in production. Many bartenders make the error of using Lillet Blanc in it’s place, but this is not the same at all. Cocchi Americano is the most authentic to flavor as the original would have been, which is why I have added it to the above recipe.

Blood and Sand

  • 1oz scotch
  • 3/4oz Sweet Vermouth
  • 3.4oz Blood Orange Juice
  • 3/4oz Cherry Heering

Garnish: Orange peel

I just learnt today that whenever ‘Sand or Sandy’ is used in a drink name before prohibition, it almost always refers to the use of scotch in the drink.

This drink is a little sweeter than the others (probably why I like it!) but very tasty and beautifully balanced with a rich orange flavor. It’s rare to find a cocktail with Scotch that works with lots of other flavors, but this one does.

The origins of this drink date back to 1922 when it was named after a bullfighter movie ‘Blood and Sand’ by Rudolph Valentino.   The red juice of the blood orange in the drink helped to link it with the film. This recipe also first appears in print in The Savoy Cocktail Book, 1930.

Satan’s Whiskers

  • 1/2 oz Gin
  • 1/2 oz Sweet vermouth
  • 1/2 oz Dry vermouth
  • 1/2 oz Fresh-squeezed orange juice
  • 1/2oz Grand Marnier
  • Dash orange bitters

Shake and strain in to a Cocktail glass.

There are two versions of this classic cocktail, one calling for Grand Marnier, the other using Orange Curaçao. The above recipe is considered the “straight” version, while the other is known as “curled”.  No idea as to the origins of this drinks name but it has an interesting mix of flavors. The orange is prominent but there is a bitterness to it and almost a peppery flavor from the gin, especially if you use something like Bombay Sapphire as the base.

I prefer the ‘straight’ version of this drink because it is slightly sweeter using Grand Marnier, but both versions are nicely balanced.  This is yet another cocktail taken from The Savoy Cocktail Book, 1930 by the way. I can’t get enough of Harry Craddock this Halloween!

Pumpkin Drinks

Zucca

  • 2oz Pisco
  • 1tsp Shredded Coconut
  • 1/4oz  Juiced Ginger
  • 2 tbsp Pumpkin Butter (Trader Joes)

Shake and strain in to a tall glass with ice.

  • Top with 1 oz Weinstephaner (Wheat Beer)

Garnish: Orange peel dusted with cinnamon

‘ Zucca’ is the Italian word for Pumpkin and is another of Greg Bryson’s drinks from his 2o12 Fall menu at Hostaria Del Piccolo, Santa Monica. I honestly thought the use of so many strong flavors like coconut, ginger, cinnamon, pumpkin and beer would taste really off balance and kind of messy. The end result is the complete opposite though! The flavors work well together and compliment each other beautifully.  Unlike most pumpkin drinks i’ve had; this one isn’t overly creamy and rich, instead it is refreshing, slightly sweet and surprisingly balanced.

The recipe is understandably a little difficult to recreate at home,so if you find yourself in Santa Monica this Autumn definitely pop in to Hostaria to try this tasty option.

 Great Pumpkin

  • 2 oz Pumpkin ale
  • 1 oz Rittenhouse Bonded rye
  • 1 oz Laird’s Bonded Apple Brandy
  • 1/2 Grade B Maple Syrup
  • 1 whole egg

Garnish: Grated Nutmeg

This creamy, pumpkin cocktail was created by Jim Meehan of PDT for his Fall menu in 2008.  It captures rich Autumnal flavors perfectly by using apple brandy, maple syrup and pumpkin ale. According to the ‘PDT Cocktail Book’, 2011 they named it ‘Great Pumpkin’ as a reference to Charles Schultz‘s masterpiece ‘It’s the Great pumpkin, Charlie Brown’, 1966.

Meehan suggests Southampton pumpkin ale, but honestly any good brand will work.  Using a whole egg makes this drink a ‘Flip’, and although a lot of people are put off by the thought of an egg in their drink, I have to say it’s honestly not so much a taste factor as it is mouth feel. When shaken well the egg creates a deliciously creamy foam, and that fluffy topping is the best part of the drink in my opinion! It basically tastes like a pumpkin egg nog.  The nutmeg gives a great nose too, this is just a perfect drink for fall.

If you want to try it somewhere special this recipe is currently available on the drinks list at The Penthouse @ Mastros in Beverly Hills.

Anyway, that’s all I have for you… Go carve your pumpkins and get in the mood for October 31st!

  

!!!! HAPPY HALLOWEEN !!!!

Leave a comment

Filed under Drink of the Week, Events, Speciality Cocktails

Drink of the Week

Acero

  • 2oz Rye
  • 3/4oz Lemon juice
  • 3/4oz Maple Syrup (Organic Grade B)
  • 1 Egg white

Garnish: Bacon piece

This drink was created by Greg Bryson for the new Fall menu that just rolled out at Hostaria Del Piccolo in Santa Monica (it will also be featured at their new location in Venice, which opens next month). The recipe was inspired by a drink called the Woodstock, which uses Gin as the base, orange bitters, Maple and Lemon juice.  I couldn’t find ANY notable history on The Woodstock i’m afraid, however the history of the Acero is simple. Greg wanted a drink using Maple Syrup for his Fall menu and after several variations found the above combination of ingredients to be the best! Hostaria Del Piccolo is an Italian Restaurant, therefore they named the drink ‘Acero’ which means ‘Maple’ in Italian.

I love this drink because it’s deliciously sweet, has a creamy texture from the egg white and the lemon balances with the Rye and Maple flavors perfectly.  The bacon garnish tastes great too, and the sweet salty pairing is a great combo.  It basically has a Whiskey Sour taste to it, only more autumnal because of the maple syrup.

I am told it does make a difference with the kind of maple syrup you use, Greg specifies to use Organic Grade B because other grades can end up being too sweet and throw the balance off.

Have a go making this at home (a great option for Thanksgiving dinner) or if you’re in Los Angeles, make a point to head over to Hostaria Del Piccolo in the coming months to try this and other great new drinks off of their menu.

ENJOY!

Leave a comment

Filed under Drink of the Week