Monthly Archives: October 2012

It’s SCARY!!!…how good these taste!

The pumpkin is carved, costume created and candy is placed in bowls ready for eager children’s hands…Yep, Halloween is upon us!

The time has come for me to put up some of my favorite ‘Halloween’ inspired mixed drinks, to get you in the mood…

Scary Classics

Corpse Reviver #2

  • 1oz Gin
  • 1oz Cocchi Americano
  • 3/4oz Cointreau
  • 3/4oz Lemon Juice
  • 1 Bar-spoon (1/2tsp) of Absinthe

Garnish: Maraschino Cherry

My first thought when I heard of this drink was ‘What about the Corpse reviver number one?!’ Apparently there are several drinks with the ‘Corpse Reviver’ name, but almost anyone who has tasted more than one would argue that this is the most palatable and balanced version.

The first publication of this drink can be seen in Harry Craddock’s The Savoy Cocktail Book’, 1930.  It is a drink that could supposedly raise any dead drinker on the morning after and was designed as a hangover cure (hence the name).

The original recipe calls for Quina Lillet, which is no longer in production. Many bartenders make the error of using Lillet Blanc in it’s place, but this is not the same at all. Cocchi Americano is the most authentic to flavor as the original would have been, which is why I have added it to the above recipe.

Blood and Sand

  • 1oz scotch
  • 3/4oz Sweet Vermouth
  • 3.4oz Blood Orange Juice
  • 3/4oz Cherry Heering

Garnish: Orange peel

I just learnt today that whenever ‘Sand or Sandy’ is used in a drink name before prohibition, it almost always refers to the use of scotch in the drink.

This drink is a little sweeter than the others (probably why I like it!) but very tasty and beautifully balanced with a rich orange flavor. It’s rare to find a cocktail with Scotch that works with lots of other flavors, but this one does.

The origins of this drink date back to 1922 when it was named after a bullfighter movie ‘Blood and Sand’ by Rudolph Valentino.   The red juice of the blood orange in the drink helped to link it with the film. This recipe also first appears in print in The Savoy Cocktail Book, 1930.

Satan’s Whiskers

  • 1/2 oz Gin
  • 1/2 oz Sweet vermouth
  • 1/2 oz Dry vermouth
  • 1/2 oz Fresh-squeezed orange juice
  • 1/2oz Grand Marnier
  • Dash orange bitters

Shake and strain in to a Cocktail glass.

There are two versions of this classic cocktail, one calling for Grand Marnier, the other using Orange Curaçao. The above recipe is considered the “straight” version, while the other is known as “curled”.  No idea as to the origins of this drinks name but it has an interesting mix of flavors. The orange is prominent but there is a bitterness to it and almost a peppery flavor from the gin, especially if you use something like Bombay Sapphire as the base.

I prefer the ‘straight’ version of this drink because it is slightly sweeter using Grand Marnier, but both versions are nicely balanced.  This is yet another cocktail taken from The Savoy Cocktail Book, 1930 by the way. I can’t get enough of Harry Craddock this Halloween!

Pumpkin Drinks

Zucca

  • 2oz Pisco
  • 1tsp Shredded Coconut
  • 1/4oz  Juiced Ginger
  • 2 tbsp Pumpkin Butter (Trader Joes)

Shake and strain in to a tall glass with ice.

  • Top with 1 oz Weinstephaner (Wheat Beer)

Garnish: Orange peel dusted with cinnamon

‘ Zucca’ is the Italian word for Pumpkin and is another of Greg Bryson’s drinks from his 2o12 Fall menu at Hostaria Del Piccolo, Santa Monica. I honestly thought the use of so many strong flavors like coconut, ginger, cinnamon, pumpkin and beer would taste really off balance and kind of messy. The end result is the complete opposite though! The flavors work well together and compliment each other beautifully.  Unlike most pumpkin drinks i’ve had; this one isn’t overly creamy and rich, instead it is refreshing, slightly sweet and surprisingly balanced.

The recipe is understandably a little difficult to recreate at home,so if you find yourself in Santa Monica this Autumn definitely pop in to Hostaria to try this tasty option.

 Great Pumpkin

  • 2 oz Pumpkin ale
  • 1 oz Rittenhouse Bonded rye
  • 1 oz Laird’s Bonded Apple Brandy
  • 1/2 Grade B Maple Syrup
  • 1 whole egg

Garnish: Grated Nutmeg

This creamy, pumpkin cocktail was created by Jim Meehan of PDT for his Fall menu in 2008.  It captures rich Autumnal flavors perfectly by using apple brandy, maple syrup and pumpkin ale. According to the ‘PDT Cocktail Book’, 2011 they named it ‘Great Pumpkin’ as a reference to Charles Schultz‘s masterpiece ‘It’s the Great pumpkin, Charlie Brown’, 1966.

Meehan suggests Southampton pumpkin ale, but honestly any good brand will work.  Using a whole egg makes this drink a ‘Flip’, and although a lot of people are put off by the thought of an egg in their drink, I have to say it’s honestly not so much a taste factor as it is mouth feel. When shaken well the egg creates a deliciously creamy foam, and that fluffy topping is the best part of the drink in my opinion! It basically tastes like a pumpkin egg nog.  The nutmeg gives a great nose too, this is just a perfect drink for fall.

If you want to try it somewhere special this recipe is currently available on the drinks list at The Penthouse @ Mastros in Beverly Hills.

Anyway, that’s all I have for you… Go carve your pumpkins and get in the mood for October 31st!

  

!!!! HAPPY HALLOWEEN !!!!

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Drink of the Week, Events, Speciality Cocktails

Drink of the Week

Acero

  • 2oz Rye
  • 3/4oz Lemon juice
  • 3/4oz Maple Syrup (Organic Grade B)
  • 1 Egg white

Garnish: Bacon piece

This drink was created by Greg Bryson for the new Fall menu that just rolled out at Hostaria Del Piccolo in Santa Monica (it will also be featured at their new location in Venice, which opens next month). The recipe was inspired by a drink called the Woodstock, which uses Gin as the base, orange bitters, Maple and Lemon juice.  I couldn’t find ANY notable history on The Woodstock i’m afraid, however the history of the Acero is simple. Greg wanted a drink using Maple Syrup for his Fall menu and after several variations found the above combination of ingredients to be the best! Hostaria Del Piccolo is an Italian Restaurant, therefore they named the drink ‘Acero’ which means ‘Maple’ in Italian.

I love this drink because it’s deliciously sweet, has a creamy texture from the egg white and the lemon balances with the Rye and Maple flavors perfectly.  The bacon garnish tastes great too, and the sweet salty pairing is a great combo.  It basically has a Whiskey Sour taste to it, only more autumnal because of the maple syrup.

I am told it does make a difference with the kind of maple syrup you use, Greg specifies to use Organic Grade B because other grades can end up being too sweet and throw the balance off.

Have a go making this at home (a great option for Thanksgiving dinner) or if you’re in Los Angeles, make a point to head over to Hostaria Del Piccolo in the coming months to try this and other great new drinks off of their menu.

ENJOY!

Leave a comment

Filed under Drink of the Week

Drink of the Week

Jack Rose

  • 2oz AppleJack Brandy
  • 3/4oz Fresh Lime juice (or Lemon juice)
  • 3/4oz Real Grenadine

Garnish: Lime or Lemon (depending on juice chosen)

Please Note: The photo above has been borrowed from YMN, and was not taken by myself.  It was the best looking image of the Jack Rose I could find.

This is such a simple drink to make at home, and such a great option for Fall.  I have been thinking about Autumnal drinks all week, and will be posting several more as my favorite bartenders roll out their fall cocktail menus.  The Jack Rose is a classic from the 1920s, we know it dates back at least this far because in Ernest Hemingway‘s 1926 classic, The Sun Also Rises, the narrator Jake drinks a Jack Rose in the Crillon Paris hotel bar.

As with many of the drinks I learn about, this too has many theories and stories of it’s origin. There are a slew of ideas that relate to it’s name, some say it is named after Gambler Bald Jack Rose, others suggested that the name was invented by Joseph P. Rose, a  New Jersey restaurateur with the nickname Jack, who once held the title of “World’s Champion Mixologist.”

There are other theories, although Wikipedia (of all places) suggests the most likely explanation of the name is the fact that it is made with applejack and is rose colored from the grenadine. This makes the most sense to me, maybe there is no dramatic reason for it’s name at all…perhaps people get so caught up in the stories they can’t see the wood for the trees!

My boyfriend just informed me that there is also a genre of drink called the ‘Rose’ which is simply a Sour with grenadine, there is a Tequila Rose, A Rye rose etc. and this drink is a an Applejack rose! The same still applies though, the drink is rose colored from the grenadine.

This is a very tasty drink with apple notes that come through from the apple brandy. I suggest using Lairds Bonded Applejack if you can get it, it works the best for me and under no circumstances use a fake grenadine like Rose’s, it will ruin the flavor profile. Take the time to make your own grenadine (pomegranate juice to equal parts sugar and a dash orange blossom water) you won’t regret it!

The Jack Rose itself is a benchmark brandy drink because of how well it pairs with the citrus and grenadine.  There is some debate as to whether it is supposed to be with lemon or lime juice, I personally prefer it with lemon but my boyfriend says lime juice works better. To each his own!

The drink is mildly sweet, strong and perfect for the Fall season we’re now in. Give it a go!

1 Comment

Filed under Drink of the Week

The Parish awaits…

The Parish
840 S. SPRING ST. (AT 9TH)
LOS ANGELES, CA 90014
213 225 2400
 

*****

Before I write this review I feel it is vital I mention how opposed I was to going to The Parish. Not because I’d heard bad things, but because i’d checked the menu online a few times and nothing ever appealed to me. Pigs ears, Fried Olives, Bone Marrow and Chicken Liver are words that tend to steer me away from a place,  I mean come on, I am the fussy one!

The boyfriend (FG) said we had to try it because our dear friend Edwin Cruz, originally of Tlapazola Grill, was working behind the bar.  It is always great when we see Edwin because not only is he as informative as he is friendly, he’s also a very talented barman.  I grudgingly agreed to give it a go, but was somewhat concerned I wouldn’t like anything on the food menu.

We arrived on a typically ‘urban’ street (dirty) in Downtown, and I once again worried at our choice for the evening but when I saw the entrance I was pleasantly surprised how pretty it was.  Fairy lights around the trees lit the way, then after going upstairs I found myself in a spacious and attractive restaurant, with a HUGE bar. I say huge because the depth of this bar is incredible, the most work surface space i’ve ever seen for a bartender.

 

I decided to start with the ‘Black bee’ which at first I thought would be a ‘beer-tail’ (a drink that tends to have majority beer and minimal anything else) but it was actually the complete opposite.

It was an interesting cocktail with a splash of stout at the end. It was great. Incredible mix of flavors from the lemon, bourbon and stout. They all came through in different waves. It had a sweetness as well as a slight bitter hoppy taste from the beer, there was also a little fruity flavor but not sure where the fruit notes were coming from. Cismontain imperial stout and Telegraph porter were the beers used and they gave some dark coffee notes too. I felt somewhat tipsy from this one drink, the mix of beer and liquor obviously got me buzzed…makes sense, being called ‘The Black Bee!’ (yeah I know, super cheesy, but it’s true!)

The Black Bee- Bourbon, Lemon Juice, Honey, Stout $12

We started with the Chicken liver on toast. Yes, you heard me, CHICKEN LIVER. At first I thought the portion was a little small for sharing, but after a few bites I understood it’s size.  It was very rich and flavorful, had a slight gamey taste but nothing too obtrusive. It was a soft rich pâté on a crunchy piece of toasted baguette, and was actually a very enjoyable dish. To be honest I was proud of myself for trying liver at all.

Chicken Liver Toast- With Bacon and Armagnac $12

FG’s first drink was the ‘Queen Anne’s revenge.’ He loves his twist on a Negroni and this was no exception. Really bitter drink with a lime nose that was interesting and seemed to keep the whole drink fairly balanced. Not for picky drinkers like myself but great for FG. The rum used was 151 lemon hart, very strong and very tasty.

Queen Annes Revenge- High Proof Demerara rum, Campari, Sweet Vermouth $13

When I read FG’s drink name I realized that the majority of the menu was inspired by England.  The whole menu had a British Gastro Pub feel to it with several uniquely British dishes such as ‘Fish and Chips’, ‘Lincolnshire meat pie’ and ‘Sticky toffee pudding.’ I felt quite at home!

Fried Chicken- Brussels sprouts, Date Vinaigrette $25

I’m not a big fan of greasy fried food anymore, but when Edwin suggested the Fried Chicken and every review we could find on The Parish from the bloggers, Yelp and Foursquare said to try it we decided we had to give it a go. I’m so happy we did.

The meat was tender and juicy, with a buttermilk battered crispy skin that wasn’t at all greasy just seasoned perfectly. It came on top of cold Brussels sprouts and dried arugula that made a delicious salad underneath. The date vinaigrette had actual pieces of date in it which added a touch of sweetness to the whole dish. Totally scrumptious!

   

Celery Root Mash- With Harissa Butter $7

We decided to order some celery mash to go alongside. OMG! this was also delicious. The Celery flavor was there but it wasn’t overbearing and the dish had an interesting texture like creamy mashed potatoes mixed with grits.  It worked with the chicken beautifully and the Harissa butter on top gave yummy spice flavors. The whole second course ensemble was serious comfort food and I loved every bite.  It was absolutely ‘finger licking food’ and at one point FG caught me cleaning the plate with my finger, I wanted every last drop! Just Excellent.

Being a true Brit myself I felt compelled to try a true Brit dessert, sticky toffee pudding. This version had dates in it, we all know how fussy I am about bits in dessert and sadly, the pudding didn’t work for me with the date pieces, but the flavors were good and FG devoured what I didn’t eat so it can’t have been bad!

Sticky Toffee Pudding $7

We finished with ‘The Nightshift’ because it seemed like a great option for an after dinner drink. It was very bitter from the espresso but the chocolate came through at the end which was nice.

I couldn’t taste the bourbon that distinctly because it was masked by the bitterness of the coffee and fernet. Not a bad drink at all, and I’m sure it would appeal to the after dinner espresso drinkers.

The Nightshift- Bourbon, Czech Fernet, Espresso, Milk, Pu-Erh Tea and Chocolate syrup $13

I am giving the drinks 4.5 out of 5 coupes.  I really enjoyed my drink and FG loved his two, they were executed perfectly by Edwin and the mix of ingredients for each drink were interesting.  John Coltharpe, previously of Seven Grand, created the bar program here and I think his choices were fun and different.  The mixed drink menu is varied and a grand selection of beers on tap makes this a great location to take any of your friends. There is something for all tastes.

I am giving the food 4.5 out of 5 Platters.  Every bite of what we ate was delicious, but admittedly I felt the menu to be a little daunting and if I hadn’t been in the mood for fried chicken i’m not sure what I would have had.  All in all this was a great night out though, and the menu forced me to try new things (which is what this blog is all about).  The music was fun and the place itself had a nice vibe. Trendy but still romantic, I really liked the atmosphere.  We will definitely return soon.

Leave a comment

Filed under Great Food, Speciality Cocktails

Drink of the Week

The Vintage Cosmo (Original Cosmopolitan)

  • 2 oz Gin
  • 3/4 oz Cointreau
  • 3/4 oz Lemon Juice
  • 5 raspberries

Shake and strain in to a coupe (this photo is in a martini glass, but you get the idea!)

Garnish: Orange Peel

This is a drink I have wanted to write about for a while, because it is one of my favorites yet not many people know of it. First off, this is the original ‘Cosmopolitan’ drink, not the version you see the girls on Sex and the City sipping, not the version most would assume a Cosmo to be (Vodka, Lime, Triple Sec and Cranberry) but a totally different drink that happens to have the same name!

This version was first seen C.1926 and was published in ‘The American travelling bartenders guide’ 1933, obviously long before the eighties version took precedence.  The Cosmo we know today is in no way related to the above version,it is merely a different publication of the same name, the inventor of this drink (still debated, so i’m not listing who it is) obviously didn’t realize they had a created a drink that already had the title.

I love this drink not just because it has Gin, which I prefer greatly to Vodka, but the cointreau, raspberry and lemon makes it a citrusy, subtly fruity and tart drink.  It is balanced and appeals to the masses. You can sweeten it with simple syrup, but the cointreau gives it a decent sweetness to begin with. I highly recommend trying the recipe at home (so easy to make), but if you are in Santa Monica this weekend I strongly suggest you pop in to Bar Chloe on 2nd and Broadway and order this drink from Head Barman Greg Bryson.

Why this weekend in particular? Well, sadly Greg aka Futuregreg (aka my boyfriend!) is pouring his last drink there this Saturday, 13th October 2012.  There will be many regulars, friends and family there for his last shift so definitely come on down for the fun occasion.

Greg has had to walk away from his beloved Bar Chloe to continue his Beverage Consulting full time at Hostaria Del Piccolo (new Venice location opens this month).  For those that don’t know Greg personally, he is someone you certainly should meet. Not only is he funny, cute and charming (yes, I am somewhat bias because he is my sweetheart) BUT he is exceptionally talented at his chosen craft and his knowledge of  ‘old school drinks’ history never ceases to amaze me, he executes drinks beautifully and has created some truly delicious concoctions of his own.

You will be seeing great things from him in the near future, guaranteed. 🙂

Come have a drink (or buy him a shot!) to see him off this Saturday, I look forward to seeing everyone there. Good luck at the new job Futuregreg, I know everyone at Bar Chloe will be very sorry to see you go.

4 Comments

Filed under Drink of the Week, Events

Drink of the Week

 The Avenue Cocktail

  • 1 oz Calvados (Henry Querville)
  • 1 oz Bourbon (Woodford reserve)
  • 1 oz Passion fruit juice
  • 1 dash real Pomegranate grenadine
  • 1 dash Orange flower water

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

I heard about this drink through The Lonsdale, a fantastic UK bar in Nottinghill, London.  They got the recipe themselves from a very rare but classic cocktail book called ‘The Café Royal Bar Book’, which became a particularly popular edition during the American prohibition period when the London cocktail scene really came to life.

Originally published in 1937, The Café Royal Cocktail Book was compiled by William Tarling, Head Bartender at the famous Café Royal in London. I haven’t seen it myself but I hear this is a great little vintage cocktail book that goes over a vast array of drinks during the early 20th Century in London. It not only has classic recipes but gives details of the history and culture of the London bar scene at the time it was printed.  This book has become somewhat of a collectors item because it only has one edition that was then reprinted in 2008 when the actual Cafe Royal Bar closed down.

The brand choices I have used in the above recipe are simply the ones that The Lonsdale selected, but other options will work nicely…feel free to experiment! The important thing to note is the fact that the book was pretty specific that the recipe uses Orange flower water (not Orange blossom water) and passion fruit juice as opposed to puree, syrup or nectar.

You get so many flavors when you try this drink. The passion fruit, orange blossom and Calvados slightly compete on the tongue but somehow work together at the end with the bourbon. The orange flower is certainly the most obvious aroma and the drink has been described by many as being intriguing due to the constant changing of flavors on the tongue. I have to admit I agree, there is a lot going on in this cocktail but it is a really tasty drink that comes together at the end. If you have the ingredients at home, I would certainly give it a go.


Leave a comment

Filed under Drink of the Week